If the bachelor’s degree isn’t enough, there also are the master’s and PhD programs in Welding Engineering.


While our students are busy with summer jobs, internships, and classes, here are a few things going on in the department this summer.

First, it’s Ohio State Fair time, and OSU’s Welding Engineering students who worked on the Moonbuggy project partnered with the College of Engineering to get an interactive engineering display at the Technology and Engineering Showcase in the Youth Center (Lausche Building). Stop by until August 7.

OSU's Moonbuggy at the Ohio State Fair

In addition, the department acquired a new “toy” that will be used in classes and welding demonstrations to show a type of solid state welding called “cold pressure welding.”    The hand-held device welds wire pieces together without the use of heat.  Forcing two wires through a die several times, exposes pure areas of metal (copper, in this video) to come in close contact with each other, so that metallic bonding occurs.

In this video, visiting high school teachers learn about materials and solid state welding at an ASM Materials Teachers camp held in the department this summer.

 


This summer -

OSU Welding Engineering students are interning at: Murray Energy, Sterling Process Eng., GE Energy, Edison Welding Institute, GE Aviation, General Dynamics-NASSCO, General Motors, Swagelok, Duke Energy, Miller Electric, Lincoln Electric, Special Metals, Techniche Universitat Bergakademie Freiberg.

OSU Welding Engineering summer interns are averaging: $17.58/hour


Posted by Megan, Academic Advisor for Welding Engineering.

One of my duties as academic advisor is to recruit new students to the Welding Engineering major. It’s a little like selling shoes; we know you need shoes, and you want to buy a pair, but we bet you’ve never seen this kind!

Welding Engineering is sort of the Rodney Dangerfield of Engineering…. “We don’t get no respect.”
The misconception that we train welders keeps students (and their parents) from giving us a second look when seeking an Engineering major at OSU.

I call it the “cocktail party” problem:
“So, I hear your son is going to OSU. What’s his major?”
“(Fill in the blank) Engineering.”
“Oh, that’s wonderful!” As long a the blank is something they’ve heard of before.

Parents don’t want to deal with:
“So, I hear your daughter is going to OSU. What’s her major?”
“Welding Engineering.”
“Oh.” lengthy pause  “Your daughter is going to be a welder? How do you feel about that?”

We know there’s nothing wrong with being a welder. Companies are begging to hire well-trained welders!
It’s just not what we do at OSU Welding Engineering!  We educate Welding Engineers who learn the science behind the welds. They understand, design, and create new processes for welding, so that welders can do their jobs with the multitude of materials, conditions, and budgets that industry throws at them.  Our Welding Engineering graduates get jobs, and are well-paid.  Nothing disrespectful about that!

Next weekend, we’re selling our shoes, er, major, at our OSU Welding Engineering Open House.  That morning, Welding Engineering juniors and seniors will host their families and alumni, while the seniors show off their final projects.  Later that afternoon, invited high school juniors and seniors and OSU Engineering students who are still looking for an engineering home, will tour our beautiful facilities and see the remarkable things our Welding Engineers do.

Slowly, but surely, we’ll convince prospective students and their parents to try on our unique line of shoes.  They’ll be walking around getting all kinds of respect.


OSU Welding Engineering students prepare for the 2011 NASA Moonbuggy competition in April.
See story in the Lantern:

http://www.thelantern.com/campus/osu-to-compete-with-moonbuggies


Senior students in the Ohio State Welding Engineering program are required to finish their year with a year-long senior capstone project.  The projects are usually done in teams, with the support from companies such as John Deere, Lincoln Electric, Caterpiller, General Electric, etc.   Here, seniors Dorian, Brian, and Paul show their advisor how a small robot welder works.

Paul explains:

We are studying the effects of shielding gas combinations on the weld properties.  We are testing four different gases, each primarily argon mixed with different levels of carbon dioxide or oxygen.

There are two different types of metal and three thicknesses of each steel being tested.  The main goal is to find the shielding gas combination that gives the best properties of the weld.

The use of a robot is essential in creating consistent welds and eliminating human error.

As seen in the video, a simple horizontal fillet weld is being made.  The testing with the robot just began and the exact parameters aren’t dialed in yet, which can be seen/heard in the video.  The robot is an education robot cell from Lincoln Electric and is very useful for small scale testing such as what we’re doing or for learning robotic welding in classrooms.


Hi, my name is Lucas Crumley, and I’m a 4th year student in Welding Engineering.

Instead of talking about my classes, I want to tell you about my job as an Engineering Ambassador. As an ambassador, I give tours to prospective high school students, but instead of covering all of campus like the University Ambassadors, I get to focus on the best part of campus: the College of Engineering!

On my tours, I show students some of the labs and classrooms that Engineering students at Ohio State typically use in their first year. I also talk about my specific experiences in classes, dealing with professors, campus life, and how and why I ended up coming to Ohio State, studying Welding Engineering.

Each ambassador is required to be able to talk about all of the Engineering Majors offered at Ohio State, but we have the freedom to promote our own majors specifically.

If you are a prospective high school student, I highly encourage you to take one of our tours because you not only get to learn about why Ohio State is an AWESOME university to attend, you get to hear our stories, experiences, and tips while seeing all that the College of Engineering has to offer.

So if you do come for a visit and attend our college overview and tour, you might get the joy of having Kristen Hammer, the only other Welding Engineering major Ambassador, or me as your tour guide – especially if you say that you want to study Welding Engineering.


Did you know that 10% of this year’s OSU Welding Engineering seniors are in the OSU Marching Band, TBDBITL?

David, Paul, and Spencer: TBDBITL 2010 Welding Engineering Seniors


It’s not all about the internship.  Sujin K. tells us what she’s been up to this summer, besides working.

People make fun of me when I say I’m from New Jersey, but I love going home for the summer. I’m away from it for so long (three months at a time), and I miss it like crazy. My internship this summer is on Long Island, which is quite a commute from home. I work 4 days a week, so I have long weekends to enjoy the many things happening in the area.

I’ve been lucky enough to go to Lake George for a weekend for my little sister’s lacrosse tournament, hike at Bear Mountain, go to Long Branch for a day at the beach, and take multiple trips into NYC.

Sujin and the giant tennis ball

A couple days before the start of the U.S. Open, my sisters and I went to Arthur Ashe Kid’s Day at the National Tennis Center grounds. We basically ran around all day watching different pros practice.  We saw Kim Clijsters, and Rafael Nadal practice, which was cool – actually seeing them in person.  Half the day was spent helping my little sister get her giant tennis ball signed by the pros walking around!

The next day, we went to the Barclays at Ridgewood Country Club.  We watched some pros practice, including Matt Kuchar, who ended up winning the whole thing. After that we followed the pairs of JP Hayes and Rickie Fowler, and Ryuji Imada and Ian Poulter from tee-off to the 9th hole. It’s definitely more fun watching golf in person, though it’s easier to see what’s happening on TV because they follow where the ball goes. Watching live, if you don’t spot the ball right away, you’re pretty much lost until you walk and see where it landed.

Note: Sujin will return to Ohio State this fall as a senior in Welding Engineering, and president of the OSU student chapter of The American Welding Society (AWS).